The Deer, the Dead and the Digital: A day at Bradgate Park

The ruins of Bradgate House.

The Digital: The ruins of Bradgate House being scanned.

A productive day was spent at Bradgate Park using our Laser Scanner to document the ruins of the Tudor house that once graced this beautiful park. This was the childhood home of Lady Jane Grey and is an interesting early example of the use of brick. This house forms the research  subject of Asem Al Bunni, a fellow PhD researcher within the Digital Building Heritage Group. Being able to help with the scanning of a section of this house was a useful exercise with the equipment which I’ll also be using for my own research. It also helped to clarify the challenges when working on site and outdoors.

The Deer: the herd of fallow deer and the autumn splendour of the park.

The Deer: the herd of fallow deer and the autumn splendour of the park.

On this cold but clear day the trees were in their best autumn colours, making this a very enjoyable experience, the herd of fallow deer adding a lively touch to an otherwise very quiet park. According to local history the oak trees serve as a reminder of the tragic fate of  Lady Jane Grey as they were symbolically pollarded after her execution 1553. Another reminder of  the connection with the Grey family can be found in the chapel, the only part of the house that still has a roof. This chapel contains the ornately carved tomb of Henry Grey, 1st Earl of Stamford and his wife Anne Cecil, their marble effigies lying side by side under a barrel vault decorated with strapwork.

 

The Dead: Effigies of Henry Grey and his wife Anne Cecil in the Chapel.

The Dead: Effigies of Henry Grey and his wife Anne Cecil in the Chapel.